Poor posture

What is good posture and why do we want it?

Good posture is all to do with gravity and forces through your body, not just a sexy hip hike.

Let’s start with the spine.

Poor posture

poor alignment

The spine is the lynch pin around which the bones and soft tissue are assembled. It should have natural curves, front to back but not side to side. The spine is a shock absorber and the curves help to reduce any impact and protect the brain. Sideways curves are ok if it’s intentional, such as a side bend, but if muscles have tightened in an unnatural pattern then postural compensation problems set in and the spine no longer acts as an effective shock absorber.

 

balanced posture

balanced posture

 

 

 

The goal is to have even weight distribution throughout the body. Children do this naturally when they learn to stand. Roughly speaking, the ear, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle should be aligned. When this is achieved we have the capacity to stand for longer periods of time as our bodies are in balance.

 

 

 

Centre of Gravity & Body Systems

Centre of Gravity is the point on a body or system, where, if pressure equal to the weight of the object is applied, forces acting on the object will be in equilibrium. The point around which the mass is centred and the location of centre of gravity in an adult human, in the anatomic position, is just in front of the second sacral vertebra. http://medical-dictionary.   This means that a vertical line just in front of your tail bone is where the centre of gravity lies.

 

Integrity is the essence of everything successful.”

R. Buckminster Fuller

tensegrity in balance

tensegrity in balance

The tensegrity model is an example of equally balanced parts. The word ‘tensegrity’ was coined by Buckminster Fuller, it combines ‘tensional integrity’. The elastic bands need to have equal tension throughout the structure, in order to keep the wooden sticks in position.

tensegrity out of balance

tensegrity out of balance

 

Tighten one band, as in the second image, and the whole structural shape changes to accommodate the new tensioned alignment.

 

 

There’s a also combination of bodily systems that work harmoniously together to create perfect posture. Visual, vestibular (hearing), muscular, proprioception (3D spacial awareness) and pressure receptors throughout the body. These all contribute to creating balance, fine tuning balance and maintaining posture.

The next time someone asks you to “sit up” or tells you “not to slouch”, think about the tensegrity model. If there is tension elsewhere in the body it may be impossible to maintain the new position for long periods of time.

Why do we need good posture?

Perfect posture helps us to move more effectively, safely, reduces the risk of injury and keeps us pain free.

What next?

Book in for a quick body check to find out about your posture, 07917 410770.

 

 

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