Here’s a few informative & inspirational videos, chosen just for you. Enjoy!

Jill Bolte Taylor: My stroke of insight

Jill Bolte Taylor got a research opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: She had a massive stroke, and watched as her brain functions — motion, speech, self-awareness — shut down one by one. An astonishing story.

My thoughts: “Not only has this brain scientist had a stroke, she analysed it happening! Some funny moments; poignant moments; la-la land and, fortunately, a happy ending.”

Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.

Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend

Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat. But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.

Leana Wen: What your doctor won’t disclose

Wouldn’t you want to know if your doctor was a paid spokesman for a drug company? Or held personal beliefs incompatible with the treatment you want? Right now, in the US at least, your doctor simply doesn’t have to tell you about that. And when physician Leana Wen asked her fellow doctors to open up, the reaction she got was … unsettling.

Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Paediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. This unfolds across a lifetime, to the point where those who’ve experienced high levels of trauma are at triple the risk for heart disease and lung cancer. An impassioned plea for paediatric medicine to confront the prevention and treatment of trauma, head-on.

Sir Ken Robinson: Do Schools Kill Creativity?

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

My thoughts: “This is on my not to be missed list. A very funny speaker with a dry sense of humour and great advocate for increasing creativity in children.”

Ernestine Shepherd: 79-Year-Old Champion Bodybuilder Sets Guinness World Record.

Ernestine “Ernie” Shepherd proves age truly is just a number. At age 79 she is a personal trainer, a professional model, a competitive bodybuilder and happier and more fulfilled than she’s ever been in her life.

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In March of 2010, on stage in Rome, Italy she was given the title of World’s Oldest Performing Female Bodybuilder by Guinness World Records. Have you ever broken a world record? Me either! Go Ernie!

You may be surprised to hear that she wasn’t always this dedicated to her health. At age 56 she was a sedentary, well-padded school secretary and “slug” who had never worked out a day in her life. It wasn’t until Ernie and her sister, Velvet went bathing suit shopping that her view changed. They both laughed at their figures and realized they needed to get in shape. Ernestine and her sister joined a gym and started working out together. Very sadly though, Velvet died suddenly from a brain aneurysm. Devastated, Ernestine stopped going to the gym. After some months of mourning the loss of her sister, a friend opened her eyes to the fact that Velvet would want her to continue what they started. Ernie returned to the gym with a reignited determination to get fit. Starting slowly and building her body step by little step, Ernestine over time completely transformed not only her body, but her life, too. She has never been happier. She trains mostly senior women and still trains as a competitive athlete and motivational speaker. Age, size, nor expectations could keep this go getter from reaching her dreams!

My thoughts: “Ernestine is a fabulous example of how we can be fit and able into older life. We just have to make a few changes.”

Lissa Rankin, MD: Is there scientific proof we can heal ourselves?

New age gurus suggest that we can heal ourselves by simply changing our minds, but is this concept grounded in cold, hard science? Lissa Rankin, MD explores the scientific literature, reviewing case studies of spontaneous remission, as well as placebo and nocebo effect data, to prove that our thoughts powerfully affect our physiology when we believe we can get well.

Lissa Rankin, MD: The shocking truth about your health

Discouraged by the broken, patriarchal health care system, she left her medical practice in 2007 only to realize that you can quit your job, but you can’t quit your calling. This epiphany launched her on a journey of discovery that led her to become a leader in the field of mind/body medicine, which she blogs about at www.owningpink.com and is writing about in her third book Mind Over Medicine: Scientific Proof You Can Heal Yourself (Hay House, 2013).

Judson Brewer: A simple way to break a bad habit

Can we break bad habits by being more curious about them? Psychiatrist Judson Brewer studies the relationship between mindfulness and addiction — from smoking to overeating to all those other things we do even though we know they’re bad for us. Learn more about the mechanism of habit development and discover a simple but profound tactic that might help you beat your next urge to smoke, snack or check a text while driving.